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Video Production Part II: Filming

July 13, 2018 | Natalie Frei | Methods & Tools |

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Rating: 4.7 out of 5

quadraticWith the extensive preparation we talked about in Part I, the implementation of your video project should be a cakewalk. However, there are still some considerations and things to pay attention to on then big day of filming, which are discussed here.

Natalie Frei, SDC

 

Setting

Keep in mind that the environment has to fit the content of your story. For example, if you interview someone about their daily work at SDC headquarters, it makes sense to show them in their office, but if you talk about deforestation and environmental protection, why not show them in front of a forest?

Make sure that there is no excessive noise or movement in the background and don’t place people too close to a wall.

Make sure there is ample space in the background.

Make sure there is ample space in the background.

 

Light

Indoors: If you deal with artificial and natural light you mix up warm and cold light, which generally creates a restive, undesirable effect. If possible, get rid of the artificial light and only use daylight from a window. Position the person in a way that the window lights their features frontally or slightly from one side and the background is dark.

Outdoors: Avoid filming at noon. The hard light coming from above will create deep shadows on people’s faces; especially dark circles around the eyes.

Never film against the light. If you are tempted to place someone in front of a window so you can see the outside – go outside!

 

Audio

Sound is just as important as image and much harder to fix or conceal if it’s bad quality. Therefore, always pre-test your microphone and if possible, listen on headphones during the recording. Immediately after recording, replay the file to check the quality.

 

Positioning

Go to episode one of this series to learn about the different shots you need to create a decent sequence.

Perspective: The perspective or point of view tells a lot about the subject’s standing in their world or at least about their self-perception.

 

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Bird’s eye view –the subject appears small and possibly helpless or weak.

Eye level view – neutral perspective, the subject appears as equal.

Eye level view – neutral perspective, the subject appears as equal.

Worm’s eye view – the subject appears as tall and powerful, possibly either domineering or heroic

Worm’s eye view – the subject appears as tall and powerful, possibly either domineering or heroic

 

Unless you have an extremely good reason to do otherwise, always use the eye level perspective for interviews. This generally portrays the person in a fair way.

 

Framing

The placing of the focal object inside the picture.

The so-called Golden Ratio is a ratio that is perceived as especially attractive and harmonious by the human eye and can be found at approximately 1:3 / 1:3 in a rectangle. Place the object you want the audience to focus on in one of the marked red spots below to use this effect:

 

The grid function can be activated in the camera settings.

The grid function can be activated in the camera settings.

The 1:3 / 1:3 effect

The 1:3 / 1:3 effect

 

Positioning can be a purely stylistic element but you can also use it to weigh importance. For instance, if you put someone in the middle of the image, you literally make them the center of attention; their expertise, feelings, opinions are emphasized. If you put them to the image border, they take more of a supporting role.

 

The position of a subject or object in an image tells a lot about it's role or relevance,.

The position of a subject or object in an image tells a lot about it’s role or relevance.

 

 Part III will be about post-production and will be published soon.

 

 

 

 

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